https://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/43/US-FederalTradeCommission-Seal.svg/150px-US-FederalTradeCommission-Seal.svg.png?resize=150%2C150Next month, the FTC will hold it’s meeting to discuss DRM technology, March 25th to be exact.  However, the cut-off date to send your comments in is today.  ARS Technica pointed out that there are over 700 comments with DRM dealings, most of them negative.

Many fans state their angerness on Spore’s DRM, as well as DRM used in the music industry.  Mark Wolf, one of many people who sent in their complaints wrote the following:

“I’ve owned numerous PC game titles from EA and Ubisoft that use DRM such as SecuROM or StarForce,” he writes. “Games I own are bought from brick-and-mortar retail outlets, or from online distributors such as Steam, Direct2Drive, or EA Link. On several occasions I’ve had to remove non-game applications, such as CD/DVD burning tools, DVD Region modification tools (since I am German and live in the US), virtual CD/DVD drives or simple CD/DVD Copying utilities, because I was having problems with games not starting after installation. I am unaware of any law that allows another program to dictate what I can and cannot have on my computer.

“The computer is my personal property, as are the applications that I install on them. I am an IT Director for a firm and understand there may be incompatibilities between applications and that issues can occur, but to blatantly have a GAME PUBLISHER ask a user to uninstall applications because they’re been “blacklisted” by their chosen DRM, is totally absurd. The applications that I use are lawfully distributed and I apply them lawfully.”

You can read all of the comments filed from the individuals here.  I cannot wait for March 25, I doubt there will be a ruling made on that day, but the issue does need to be brought up to officials, and that’s exactly what this event will do.